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This manicure just gave birth, and you have to see the baby

10 heures 15 minutes ago

Umbilical cords are not usually part of the traditional manicure experience.  Thankfully, there are exceptions to the rule. Russian nail artist Nail Sunny recently shared intricate nail art featuring a detailed chair (with stirrups) and a little woman in a pink hospital gown.  The nail appears to be giving birth. > View this post on Instagram > > Baby birth -❤️ or ? Video by @edo_movs #nailsunnytutorial > > A post shared by Nail Sunny (@nail_sunny) on Jan 17, 2019 at 8:49am PST SEE ALSO: 'Nail Art History' Puts a Museum at Your Fingertips Once the chair and body (made of gel) are affixed neatly to the nail, "the baby" is born. A scalpel reaches into the frame and quite literally plucks a little acrylic baby from beneath the woman's gown.  Next, the umbilical cord is cut with a pair of tweezers and the newborn gel baby is placed with its gel mother. It's all very surreal.  Nail Sunny is no stranger to impractically eye-catching nails. Scroll through the page long enough and you'll find hookah nails (real smoke!), salt bae nails (real steak!), and Grinch nails (synthetic green fur!). > View this post on Instagram > > @world_record_egg challenge Let's set a world record together and get the most liked video post on Instagram PLEASE LIKE THIS VIDEO @nail_sunny #NAILSUNNYTUTORIAL p.s. Конечно же мы не могли не отреагировать на событие сегодняшнего дня , которое перевернуло жизнь @kyliejenner #guinnessworldrecord #wlrldrecordegg #worldrecord #worldrecordholder #worldrecords video by @edo_movs > > A post shared by Nail Sunny (@nail_sunny) on Jan 14, 2019 at 8:44am PST > View this post on Instagram > > Yes or no ? > > A post shared by Nail Sunny (@nail_sunny) on Jan 12, 2019 at 10:10am PST The account often documents the process it took to make the nails. Plus, the video clips are set to top 40 music, so don't worry about providing a playlist.  Now we just want to see the recipient of the manicure open a can of soda. ## WATCH: 'Hair nails' are the latest trend we hope won't grow on you


In third year, U.S. women's marches turn to 2020 elections

12 heures 34 minutes ago

Millions of people took part in the women's marches in Washington and other cities in the United States and abroad on Jan. 21, 2017, the day after the Republican president was sworn in. Vanessa Wruble, a co-founder of the original Women's March on Washington who left to start March On, a separate grassroots coalition, said the movement has evolved from being a reaction to Trump's presidency. Women's March, a national nonprofit organization that evolved from the initial Washington march, is using its #WomensWave marches in Washington and elsewhere on Saturday to roll out a 10-part policy platform that includes raising the federal minimum wage and protecting reproductive rights.


Oxford University suspends funding from China's Huawei

14 heures 9 minutes ago

The University of Oxford said on Thursday it has stopped accepting funding from China's Huawei Technologies [HWT.UL], the leading global supplier of telecoms network equipment, after scrutiny over the company's relationship with China’s government. "Oxford University decided on January 8 this year that it will not pursue new funding opportunities with Huawei Technologies Co Ltd or its related group companies at present," the university said in a statement. "The decision has been taken in the light of public concerns raised in recent months surrounding UK partnerships with Huawei.


Apple boss Tim Cook attacks 'shadow economy' of data in call for new privacy law

14 heures 10 minutes ago

Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook has called for the US to introduce a national privacy law, attacking a “shadow economy” in which people’s personal data is bought and sold without their knowledge. Mr Cook said companies should have to collect as little data as possible and make it easy for people to delete the information that is held about them. It is the latest attempt from Apple to position itself as the steward of consumers’ privacy, and to draw a line between itself and companies such as Facebook and Google. Mr Cook said that people need to “win back their right to privacy” and that companies that sell data should have to register with the Federal Trade Commission, the US consumer watchdog. “I and others are calling on the US Congress to pass comprehensive federal privacy legislation - a landmark package of reforms that protect and empower the consumer,” Mr Cook wrote in Time Magazine. He singled out “data brokers”, companies that purchase, bundle up and sell data on individuals, such as credit reference agencies, saying that most people were unaware of how companies transact in their data. “Right now, all of these secondary markets for your information exist in a shadow economy that’s largely unchecked. Let’s be clear: you never signed up for that,” Mr Cook wrote. The US does not have a national equivalent to the UK’s Data Protection Act or the European privacy legislation, GDPR. Facebook, Amazon and Google have all said they would support a law, but failed to put forward any concrete proposals. Mr Cook said companies should aim to minimise the amount of data they collect and make it easier for people to delete or correct it. Mr Cook has played up Apple’s privacy credentials in recent months, as sales of its iPhones stumble and as Google and Facebook have been embroiled in repeated data controversies. Its privacy commitment has come under scrutiny, since Apple receives billions of dollars a year from Google to be the default search engine on the iPhone. Mr Cook has defended the deal, saying the company has built in controls to limit how much users can be tracked.


NASA’s Cassini spacecraft spotted fresh rainfall on Saturn’s moon Titan

16 heures 7 minutes ago

NASA's Cassini orbiter has been dead for well over a year now, but its incredible discoveries continue to trickle in as researchers pore over data and images it collected while it was active. Consequently, studies focused on the orbiter's findings continue to crop up on a regular basis, such as a recent study from University of Idaho in Moscow doctoral student Rajani Dhingra, who, along with her colleagues, found evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in an image taken on June 7th, 2016. This indicates that summer had arrived on the moon's northern hemisphere later than climate models had predicted. "The whole Titan community has been looking forward to seeing clouds and rains on Titan's north pole, indicating the start of the northern summer, but despite what the climate models had predicted, we weren't even seeing any clouds," said Dhingra, lead author of the study. "People called it the curious case of missing clouds." Dhingra and her colleagues spotted a reflective feature near the north pole of Titan in the aforementioned image -- a feature which covered approximately 46,332 square miles -- which had never appeared before, and didn't appear when Cassini passed by again. Dhingra concluded that the reflective nature of the feature was due to sunlight reflecting off of a wet surface, which she believes was the result of a methane rainfall event. This is the first time summer rainfall has ever been observed on Titan. While Earth experiences four seasons over the course of a year, a single season on Titan lasts seven Earth years. When Cassini reached Titan, clouds and rainfall were observed in the southern hemisphere, signaling a southern summer. Climate models predicted the rain would move to the northern hemisphere "leading up to the northern summer solstice in 2017," but the clouds still hadn't appeared by 2016. The images above should help reseachers understand why this was the case. We want our model predictions to match our observations. This rainfall detection proves Cassini's climate follows the theoretical climate models we know of," Dhingra said. "Summer is happening. It was delayed, but it's happening. We will have to figure out what caused the delay, though."


Sniffer dogs, bomb experts comb through Kenya attack site

17 heures 43 minutes ago

Kenyan police aided by bomb experts and sniffer dogs on Thursday resumed their search of the Nairobi hotel complex struck by Islamists as police arrested nine more suspects over the attack which left 21 dead and 28 injured. A police source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said they were confident there were no more people trapped inside the hotel or surrounding office buildings after the 20-hour assault unleashed on Tuesday, during which some 700 civilians were rescued. Five gunmen with the Al-Qaeda-linked Somali militant group Al-Shabaab attacked the DusitD2 hotel and office complex on Tuesday afternoon.


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5 heures 48 minutes ago
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